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Somehow my old phone became possessed and despite several “I command you out demon” attempts by yours truly, I needed to take the leap and call customer service.

I spoke with a Customer Service Rep at Verizon and explained my situation. I told him how it was all good because now I had a pass from my wife to buy the new I-Phone. I don’t think he responded to that, but who the hell am I to think that I can always be charming and entertaining.

I explained to him how frustrating my online experience was because they wanted to text a new temporary password and meanwhile  the screen on my phone was shot so I couldn’t access the new code.

He didn’t say anything but I could hear lots of keys being hit on his keyboard.

He explained to me that I just needed to authorize one of my other lines as the main phone and we could start from scratch.

A few minutes later I was on my way.

As soon as my son gets home from school I confiscate his phone and call back Verizon because I now have another question.

I speak to a different rep this time.

She pulls up the notes gets me set up and then asks me what my plans are for a new phone.

I tell her.

She seems genuinely happy for me and tells me that I will love the phone. She asks if I would mind holding while she checks inventory before sending me to the other department.

Note: She did this to save me the inconvenience of getting transferred,  waiting on hold,  only to be told they were fresh out. I think some call this ancient art “caring”

She’s back in a jif and then has to break the bad news to me that they are out.

I was nice but must admit my tone was similar to the kid who thought he was getting the bike for Christmas only to get a years supply of Shamwow.

But here’s the best part. I really believe the person on the other line, was upset as well.

I told her no worries and that I would wait it out;  then she did something pretty cool.

She said Paul, I follow your blog and I love you  . . . Actually, I can’t back that up, but did I get you for like a millisecond on that one?

Any who, she said, “let me check the Apple site”

Woh, Uno Freakin Momento, Stop the presses!

Her work was technically done and now she is going above and beyond?

Well you my dear, rock and I don’t care who knows it!

She tells me, that it looks like they have plenty of inventory and then tells me step by step how to order it from Apple.

We part ways, I order the phone and balance has been once again restored to the galaxy.

It made me think that while the first customer service rep did nothing wrong he just wasn’t outstanding.

Does that make sense?

He lacked personality and by way of confession I wanted to yell “CLEAR” a few times while defibrillating his personality but whatcha gonna do?

He also may have forgotten that while he has dealt with this numerous times or this is call number 50 today . . . this was my first!

The second customer service rep:

Removed the transaction and made it a “visit”

She cared

Went above and beyond without playing the old “It’s not my job” card.

But most of all . . . She added the most valuable thing in the world . . .

It’s the thing that adds meaning to the procedures, the experience and even the brand that she represented when she took my call.

She added herself!

The one truly sustainable competitive advantage!

Be outstanding today by serving up your job with a side order of YOU!


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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The night before this week’s Super Bowl game, Green Bay Packers coach Mike McCarthy did something extremely gutsy.

McCarthy cancelled the final team meeting and had everyone fitted for their Super Bowl rings.

A gutsy move considering the battle hadn’t taken place yet.

A gutsy move considering the ridicule one might face if victory went to the Steelers.

According to Middle Linebacker Desmond Bishop “It let us know that we’re right there on the cusp of going down in history, and it made us want it so badly.”

Ultimately McCarthy’s strategy paid off!

McCarthy isn’t the first to DECIDE to be victorious.

Jim Carrey wrote himself a check for million when he arrived in Hollywood at age 17.

Invading armies have burned their boats and bridges behind them so victory was no longer optional!

All of these examples involve decisions.

Bold decisions, but decisions nonetheless.

Tony Robbins talks about decisions with respect to the Latin derivative of the verb which means

To cut off all alternatives, all possibilities. (I like the color green, it reminds me of something)

Disclaimer: This isn’t a green light to sing “Take this job and shove it” in your cubicle.

Its simply an invitation to take that plan you hopefully have.

Take action on that plan.

Be dedicated enough to your purpose to adjust the plan as many times until . . .

You have realized your victory . . .

Because you had the guts to DECIDE that failure isn’t an option.

So perhaps this is a great time for me to pose the question.

One month into a bright shiny new year, with new possibilities.

Have you truly decided to win?

Oh, and before you go, indecision is a decision too.


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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There has been a lot of talk lately on the old “If you don’t know someone that invites you to their network, should you accept the invite” thing.

If you would have asked me that question just a short time ago, I would have been one of the people saying “hell no”.

Then the weirdest thing happened . . .

I changed my philosophy.

I no longer feel I need to know someone to accept their invite because I now feel that the purpose of accepting the invite is to begin a courtship to know each other.

But . . .

Its really nervy for a stranger to ask me to connect.

Lighten up Francis!

It’s “Social” Networking. People will sometimes try to be “Social” with you. Bastards!

And let’s stop reacting to this like a stranger just asked us to join them in a threesome. Its an invite which in my version of “Social” Networking means its an opportunity to get to know them.

It’s a courtship dude. Nobody is asking you marry them just yet.

But . . .

I won’t accept an invite unless I have met them or spoken with them first

Thanks to all of us getting burned by people who have used those opportunities to launch into an obnoxious  infomercial and a little thing called “not having enough hours in the day” this approach isn’t practical for many people.

And while a “connection” “friend” etc is useless until we transition to real time, I believe we might be putting the proverbial cart before the horse.

But . . .

There’s no possible way you can know all your connections if you have a lot of them!

Why couldn’t I treat this like a prospecting funnel (but on steroids) where I begin with a suspect with a goal of converting that suspect.

Do you really know someone at the suspect level or does that happen as you work your way through the funnel?

Also, you need to remember that you don’t have to know everyone to influence them or influence them to pass along your info, content etc to their network. And quite unselfishly, you don’t have to know everyone to be of value to them which in essence helps build brand equity!

Does your company know everyone it sends those email blasts and direct mail pieces to?

But isn’t it better to be more targeted in your approach?

I almost want to reject the question.

Why can’t I do both once again keeping in alignment with that funnel concept?

But . . .

I get put off when it is clear that they are just trying to accumulate connections.

Get passed that. I see it as a free lottery ticket with zero chance of winning if I ignore it.

And here’s the thing folks, just because it might seem like we can’t do business today, doesn’t mean that we can’t do business tomorrow.

Case in point. At the beginning of this year Linkedin sent me an email stating that approximately 350 people in my network changed jobs.

Is it possible that that change could result in new opportunities?

Is it possible that that change now puts them in front of new people that could use my product or service?

Now I want to be clear, I see people running around Linkedin bragging about how many connections they have.

I’m not saying we should morph into that . . . in fact, please don’t!

I’m just inviting you to consider an approach that opens you up to additional opportunities.

And should you disagree, that’s perfectly fine.

That’s the beauty of social networking, we can all create the version that works best for us

Related posts:

Confessions Of A Social Networking Snob

21 Ways to Master Linkedin

Twitter . . . A Study On Those Who Get It

Twitter For The Aspiring Rock Star

How To Become More Visible To Your Network

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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Paul is off training Jedis today so here’s a guest post from Colin Parker!

When we bought our new van, the dealership gave us a gift that has proven valuable time and time again.  An emergency survival kit.  It came complete with jumper cables, flashlight (with batteries), gloves, reflective tape and a variety of other very useful things.  Last week, one of my kids left a van door open.  In the morning, our battery was dead and as I used the jumper cables for the umpeenth time, I was thankful again for having the kit.

As a sales rep, it is critical to have an emergency survival kit of sorts when you leave your office for a meeting with a prospect or client.  I compiled a list of the top 10 things to include in your emergency sales kit.

1.  Extra pens.  Test them and make sure they work.

2.  If your meeting will involve using your laptop, ensure your laptop battery is charged, bring the power cord and an extension cord.  Ditto for any other electronics.

3.  Keep an extra shirt in your car.  You just never know when that coffee cup lid will fail to function properly.

4.  If you do drink coffee, trust me, you’ll want breath mints or mouthwash nearby.  Use them.

5.  Business cards are a must.  Bring many.

If you’ve been in sales for any length of time, you may already bring the above things with you.  Once you sit in one or two meetings with your tie strategically placed over a coffee stain, you figure out to carry an extra shirt.  But I’d like you to take your sales survival kit to a deeper level.   You’ll notice I didn’t include things like “brochures and marketing materials” above, because that might give the impression that you should bring and provide every piece of collateral your crack-marketing team has produced.  DON’T!

You should have stuff with you, but it should be used strategically – based upon those things you hear your prospect saying and asking during your meeting.  Consider the rest of the list critical to ensure you are able to move your sale forward by providing your prospect with relevant information:

6.  Video testimonials.  If your prospect starts to ask questions like, “Who else has used this product?” or “Do you have any references or case studies?”  having video testimonials on your laptop could be helpful.

7.  Reports and data sheets.  Questions that focus around the statistics for your product would indicate that you are speaking to someone who likes the facts and figures.  Having professional looking, color reports that address relevant data would be handy to provide if this is your prospect.

8.  Exhibits.  This might be the actual product itself, or if you are in a service industry, it would be materials that make the service come alive for the prospect.  It allows them to make what you are speaking about more tangible.

9.  Demonstrations.  If your prospect seems to wonder, “Yes, but how does it work?” being able to give a live demonstration or provide a video of the product or service in action would be just the thing to provide clarity.  This is especially important if your product or service has multiple processes or steps involved.  It takes the exhibit into more depth.

10. Agendas and schedules.  Ideally, your prospect will be so impressed with your presentation of relevant materials (and with your clean shirt) that they will ask, “Ok, if we decide to move forward, what next?”  Having an outline of the process involved for implementing your service or products is critical to provide.  If you have to go back to the office and email this information, you lose momentum and possibly the sale.

Having relevant information at your fingertips is the very essence of your sales survival kit.  Just like I don’t pull out my jumper cables at every stop – having what you need and knowing when to use it will take your sales to the next level.

Colin Parker is CEO of Red Giraffe Strategic Sales and Marketing.  Colin’s experience spans 20+ years and includes Vice President positions with global organizations.  Red Giraffe specializes in helping professional service providers differentiate themselves from the herd of competition in their marketplace.  Contact Colin through www.AboveTheHerd.com

or follow his blog

http://abovetheherd.com/conversation/blog/


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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Winter is here…and there’s still a long way to go…so choose to love it.

From previous blogs or our work together, you’ve learned how choosing to have a positive attitude is critical to your success and overall happiness.  Yes, you choose happiness.

Remember, your attitude will drive your actions, which produces your results.

So, whatever happens in business, at school, at home, and …yes…even with the weather, you must find a way to remain positive.  Now, don’t get me wrong. When I wake up on a Wednesday morning and there’s another foot of snow to get rid of before my two hour commute to Boston, I’m not singing “Winter Wonderland”…not immediately.  But I have conditioned myself to breathe when I feel stress rising, and then accept what I cannot change.  Then, instead of dwelling on all of the negative attributes of the situation (that I can’t control anyway), I instead choose to reflect on that which is positive.  Take Winter for example.  With snow shoes and the right clothing, there’s nothing better. Shoveling equals forced exercise (which most of us need). Deer frequent my yard. The fireplace will be going this weekend with family, hot chocolate and whipped cream…ahhh! For commuters, download an audio book and actually enjoy the ride.  I chose to live in New England…and I love it.  I accept and embrace Winter as part of what makes home a special place.  What will you do this weekend to ensure you enjoy this remarkable season?  Go sledding?  Build a snowman?  Shovel snow for an elderly neighbor?  Host a Winter block party with a backyard bonfire?  If you disagree with this blog and are overcome with the intense desire to throw a snowball in my direction, then use that as a sign that you need to carve out some time to readjust your attitude towards Winter…or whatever is causing your negativity.  After all, this isn’t just about Winter.  Contact me with your results and feedback.  Thanks for reading!


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Have a quick two minute tip for you today that might make a huge difference in your attitude and perhaps all those you influence each day!

Please scroll down and have a listen on the handy dandy audio player!

Download this episode (right click and save)


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Once upon a time in a sales cubicle far, far away I managed a sales team that had a very cool luxury . . . a team of inside sales jedis who’s sole purpose was to set appointments for the outside sales jedis.

Pretty freakin cool . . . huh?

Well, upon mucho reviews and mucho ride alongs I noticed something rather disturbing.

We were sitting on top of a territory that had all the big game, but were only getting in front of the road kill.

I confronted the head of the department and was told that “nobody in the big companies wants to see us” I don’t remember how I responded and quite frankly it doesn’t matter but I do remember what happened later that night when everyone left the office.

Note: this next part requires a humming of the Mission Impossible theme and picturing me flying into the bullpen on a zip line. My blog . . . I can BS if I want to.

I decided to look through their notes which brings us to

Note #2: The company I worked for didn’t give us computers so we had everything on 3×5 cards. Very disturbing considering this was 1998 but any who . . .

I quickly understood what the problem was

It was their notes.

Things like (earmuffs some strong language coming up)

“Total b*tch hung up on me”

“Screw this guy. Total A-hole”

You get the picture.

So every time they would come across these contacts, they would naturally avoid calling.

Or worse yet, call with a certain tone of defensiveness that I’m sure could be felt on the other end.

Then a wave of genius hit me.

I was about to hire a new outbound rep, so . . .

What if me and my group of outside jedi were to rewrite the cards and do the unthinkable.

Give them to the new rep as if they were the “Glenngary” leads.

So for the next few weeks, we rewrote approximately 5,000 cards removing the comments.

When I hired the new rep, I told her that the others would be jealous and she was not to tell them about the “special” leads or

Listen to anyone who told her she was wasting her time.

By the end of that year, we signed massive amounts of business, my team went from 110th worldwide to 13th and two of my jedis were ranked in the top 20.

All because we created a new self fulfilling prophecy!

It makes me want to offer some questions to consider . . .

What is the overall tone of the notes you review when calling a prospect?

What affect do they have on your attitude and willingness to call?

How appropriate is it to vent through your notes in the first place?

Have you ever avoided an account simply because one of the veterans told you you’re wasting your time (meanwhile they are basing this on a solitary call made to the prospect back in 1976)

And just for the heck of it . . .

If someone is an idiot to you

Could it have just been “one of those days”

Did your approach  add to that certain pissiness? Not saying its justified, just sayin.

Could things have changed since your last call (like they are now on Prozac or the recipient of a successful exorcism)

Or maybe one of these things happened in this Free Poster

Things change!

Today, you are cordially invited to think about these little moments of venting and how they influence your future behavior and . . .

How they influence your behavior today as you set out to put a new ding in the universe!

Today’s News: Have we connected on Facebook? Feel free to click here to go to my personal page (this isn’t the Sales Playbook fan page)


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Click here to read Content Strategy – Six Steps to Better Content: Introduction – Part 1

Understanding Content Strategy

To understand content strategy, you need to understand that creating good content is more than just putting words and pictures together. Good content involves:

  • Understanding your target audience’s needs
  • Defining your organizational ability to meet them
  • Setting content goals to address those needs
  • Conducting a content audit to determine what, if any, usable content already exists
  • Assessing what shape that content’s in – does it need refreshing or serious overhauling?
  • Determining what new content is required
  • Determining who’s going to provide it and where and how it’s going to be used

To ascertain all the above, you need to go through the steps mentioned earlier. The result of this process will be an outline of actions needed to successfully produce the valuable content you need without head-scratching, finger-pointing, and frustrating delays.

6 Steps for Creating More Effective Content

While there is perhaps any number of ways to go about creating content, they all boil down to these six basic steps that, in a proactive organization, form a cycle of renewal:

6 Steps to Content Writing

6 Steps for Creating More Effective Content

We’ll now take a look at how each one of these steps, when completed as thoroughly and accurately as possible, will provide a solid, actionable content strategy grounded in reality while avoiding the pitfalls of assumption and wishful thinking. The first three steps guide the development of your strategy, the second three show you how to implement it.


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Did you hear the one about the client who went to his inbox to find a “happy anniversary” email with a handy dandy gift certificate attached.

No?

Nor will you because it rarely happens.

Unbeknownst to me, it was my 1 year anniversary with audible.com and they decided to do the unthinkable . . . show gratitude with a surprise.

And this isn’t the first time. They sent me a free download at the holidays too.

It made me think that whether it be . . .

The shear “WOOHOONESS”  of getting a surprise

The waking up of our “inner child” or

Just the feeling of acknowledgement that we are indeed valued . . .

Perhaps the surprise is an underutilized Jedi mind trick?

Some things to think about

1)    Birthdays: Don’t believe anyone who tells you they don’t give a sh*t about their own birthday because they suddenly do when you miss it.

2)    Anniversaries: I like this one and would invite all our leaders out there to remember employee anniversaries too!

3)    Gratitude: How can you thank your clients in new and exciting ways? Bonus points if you surprise them just because!

Way Cool Surprise My Family Received:

My Dad worked for General Mills many years ago. Every once in a while, when Dad was away on business,  the company would send a box filled with their products along with a note thanking us for letting them “borrow” Dad.

I know a very successful sales rep (now President of his own company) who used to randomly hand out Starbucks cards to his support team. Just in case you didn’t get the memo on this type of thing . . . people dig it!

Homework Assignment (Yep you aren’t gonna just come here and read my rants and not own the material dude)

Today (as in not tomorrow) you are to think of at least one way to surprise:

A client

An employee, coworker or what the hell . . . the boss!

And just for good measure . . .

Surprise someone in your personal life!

Before you go, I have a little word of advice for you . . .

“Courtships” should never end after the marriage!

Today’s News: We will will be having a little give away over on our Facebook Fan Page. Nothing major and you won’t be able to retire from it but you will get to embrace your inner “WOOHOONESS” if you win. We’ll have the details up on Facebook early Wednesday am. Meanwhile, why don’t you stop by and “like” us already!  Click here to join the festivities


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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1) Link to inactive social networking accounts: So there’s a prospect, interested enough to check out your Linkedin profile. They click on your Twitter link thinking “Cool, I spend more time there anyway” then they discover your account either has zero tweets or the last time you tweeted was back in late 2009. I’ve seen this with inactive blogs and even websites. Please go back and update or report to the Principals office folks. Inexcusable!

2)    Dancing the “Linkedin two step”. This is when you accept someone’s invite and they immediate launch into their sales pitch. Not bueno! Think courtship not singles bar.

3)    Start a discussion and then go MIA. Would you walk into a room, start a discussion and then slip out the back Jack? Of course not. Then why do so many people start Linkedin discussions and then leave without any acknowledgement of the comments? Stick around and facilitate your discussions unless you are striving for a certain David Copperfield vibe.

4)    Continually engage in negativity, combativeness etc. I don’t care if someone gives you the old virtual finger by calling you out publicly or if you just have a need to rip apart someone’s logic in a discussion . . . its bad news. Also, and how shall I say this, your network hates when all you do is complain in your status updates and tweets. Do you really think people say, I wonder what kind of cool negative sh*t that rascal Castain is tweeting about today? You don’t have to be everyone’s best friend, but let’s stop playing the A Hole card already.

5)    Stalk people: liking everything, commenting on every status update. Its just creepy and I will leave it at that. I have this sudden urge to ask if anyone has seen that movie Silence of The Lambs. Don’t know why.

6)    Broadcasting instead of interacting. I see this happen way too many times on Twitter. Quite frankly it bores the hell out me. Let’s make sure that somewhere between all the links, quotes, tips etc we are thanking, acknowledging, validating and showing the world that there is indeed a human being behind the tweets. And in my case, a human being who finds the word “tweet” unmanly.

7)    Too much me, not enough them. You’ve seen it before: “Check out my Facebook fan page” “I’m speaking at . . . “My latest blog post . . .” and even the more sophisticated narcissist who will only retweet those who are mentioning them. I believe the key to your rock stardom rests in your ability to make others look like rock stars. Doing so creates legions of fans who will in turn become brand evangelists . . . spreading the good news about . . . YOU!

8)    Flooding The Twitter Stream With Irrelevant Data: Live tweeting, twitter chat, rapid fire tweets, mucho foursquare updates. This is a rant for another day but I can tell you its annoying and can get you unfollowed right quick. Please think value before you send this stuff. Better yet, put yourself in your follower’s shoes who’s twitter stream get’s flooded with your need to tweet a sound byte from a conference that we really needed to be there to understand. Same with Twitter Chats and tweeting 7 links in 3 seconds. Did I mention you should think?

9)     Too much duplication of your message across the platforms. As someone who participates actively on the Big 3 (Twitter,LinkedinFacebook) I know that I need to bring my content to each, but if all I am doing is sending the same stuff to 3 places and you follow me in all 3 places, doesn’t that sort of punish you? My suggestion is to offer things in each platform that you don’t offer in the others. Just a thought.

10)  Linkedin template. I won’t say more than my usual “I think using templates put forth the worst possible ‘you’ as far as a first impression” I would go as far as to say that if you don’t have the 20 seconds to introduce yourself properly, what makes you think you’ll have the time to properly nurture the new connection? Besides, you’re better than that!

11)  Ask for a recommendation from someone who basically said hello to you once.

12)  Asking for a recommendation from someone and using the template. Hang your head if you ever did this.

All joking (and self righteousness) aside, I’ve made lots of mistakes in my efforts to be a social networking rock star. I will openly admit that I’m a work in progress!

My suggestion to you would be to take the time to think things through a bit and model the people who are getting the results you wish to obtain.

Oh and just for the heck of it, pretend you are the person at the other end of your social networking efforts.  If you find yourself saying “that’s not cool” even once, then it might be time for a course correction my friend.

Today, you are cordially invited to make a better first impression!

Here’s a cool, free E-Book for you with 21 Ways For You To Master Linkedin . . . Enjoy!


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2011. |
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